Ba Kae? Former World Cup stars, what are they up to now?

June 10, 2014 at 4:24 pm
Posted under: 2014 FIFA World Cup, History, News
Legends of the game come and go, others taking more time to than those before. We looked at some of the telling moments of stars that onced graced our football stage.

Assistant-coach of Real Madrid Zinedine Zidane looks on during the UEFA Champions League final between Real Madrid and Atletico de Madrid at Estadio da Luz stadium on May 24, 2014 in Lisbon, Portugal. (Photo by Jean Catuffe/Getty Images)
Assistant-coach of Real Madrid Zinedine Zidane looks on during the UEFA Champions League final between Real Madrid and Atletico de Madrid at Estadio da Luz stadium on May 24, 2014 in Lisbon, Portugal. (Photo by Jean Catuffe/Getty Images)

1974: Johan Neeskens (Netherlands) was the stand out player in the World Cup that year.

The once scoring ace became a manager for South African team, Mamelodi Sundowns, but was sacked after a defeat to Bloemfontein Celtic in the South African Telkom Knockout final in 2012 where Sundowns lost 1-0. He has since fallen off the global radar.

1978: Pieter Robert Rensenbrink (Netherlands) was the stand out player in the ’78 World Cup.

The skilful left winger who was nicknamed the ‘snake man’ has just been inducted into the FIFA top 100 greatest players of all time. Rensenbrink lives in Amsterdam and has no aspirations to become a coach.

1982: Paolo Rossi (Italy) is named one of FIFA’s Top 100 greatest living footballers and was a prolific goal scorer in his time. Rossi, having played for big teams such as Juventus and AC Milan, was also one of the most expensive footballers of his time.

Rossi is now working as a sports journalist for the Juventus Channel in Italy.

1986: Diego Maradona (Argentina) was undoubtedly the best player in the 1986 World Cup, confirmed by the FIFA technical team who decides who should be named top tournament players. He is best known for his iconic goal named the ‘Hand of God’

Maradona returned to the football scene in 2010 as the manager of the Argentinean team. The team did not do very well which resulted in him being sacked.

Although he is 53 years of old, Maradona still wants to play football.

1990: Salvatore Schillaci (Italy) was the best player in the 1990 World Cup – an accolade he earned as the tournament’s leading goal scorer.

The scoring ace retired from professional football in 1999 and now runs a youth academy that develops young sporting talent.

1994: Romário de Souza Faria (Brazil) is considered one of the most prolific strikers to ever have graced the football scene and was part the 1994 World Cup’s winning Brazilian side.

He retired from football at the age of 42 and is currently a politician.

1998: Ronaldo Luís Nazário de Lima (Brazil) is undoubtedly one of the greatest players to have ever played the sport. His career boasts playing for teams like Barcelona, Real Madrid, Inter Milan and AC Milan.

He is one of only three men to have won the FIFA World Player of the Year award more than once.

He now works for the various planning committees arranging the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2018 Olympics.

2002: Oliver Kahn (Germany) was the first goalkeeper ever to be recognised as the most outstanding player in a world cup. Known for his brute approach, he was a force to be reckoned with.

He has won 8 Bundesliga titles, the UEFA Champions League, and the UEFA Cup in his career.

He started playing for Bayern Munich in 1994 and retired at the club in 2008.

He is now a football analyst on German television and is involved in mentoring young players.

2006: Zinedine Zidane (France) was the most prolific number 10 and is known for his skill and unmatched finesse in play. He was named the best player at the 2006 World Cup even though he received a red card in his last match at the tournament for unbecoming conduct on the field of play.

Zidane is now on the technical team for Real Madrid FC.

2010: Giovanni Christiaan van Bronckhorst (Netherlands) was the stand out player at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa. You might know him as the man who scored what FIFA dubbed the goal of the tournament against Uruguay.

He retired from football after the 2010 World Cup. He was elected into the Order of Orange-Nassau, a military and civil Dutch order of chivalry, in 2010. He is also the assistant trainer at Dutch team Feyenoord.


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